Brian Hagedorn. Lisa Neubauer’s opponent in April 2 election for State Supreme Court, appearing at Ripon College on Monday, March 11.

The following is a slightly edited version of an announcement posted by Jaye Alderson, March 6, 2019, in Political PublicationsSpecial Event on the Ripon College website.

Brian Hagedorn, who is running for the Wisconsin Supreme Court, will speak at Ripon College, on Monday, March 11.

His talk will begin at 4:30 p.m. in Kresge Little Theatre, East Hall. It is free and open to the public.

Ripon College Republicans is [sic] hosting Hagedorn’s talk.

Hagedorn is running for the State Supreme Court in the election on April 2. His opponent is Judge Lisa Neubauer.

Hagedorn is a judge of the Wisconsin Court of Appeals, serving in the court’s Waukesha-based District II since Aug. 1, 2015.

Hagedorn served as chief legal counsel to Gov. Scott Walker for almost five years, where he managed litigation in partnership with the attorney general, served as the top ethics officer for the administration, advised on legal policy issues, oversaw judicial and district attorney appointments, and provided legal analysis on proposed legislation.Walker appointed him to the bench in 2015 and won election to a new six-year term in April 2017. He was appointed by the Wisconsin Supreme Court to serve on the Wisconsin Judicial Commission, which oversees enforcement of the judicial code of ethics.
He also has served as an assistant attorney general at the Wisconsin Department of Justice, a law clerk for Wisconsin Supreme Court Justice Michael Gableman, and as an attorney in private practice for a Milwaukee law firm.

Gov. Evers says property tax bills should show funds diverted to voucher schools


Gov. Tony Evers is proposing that property tax bills to show how money is being spent on voucher schools. Currently, property tax bills do not break out this spending. Supporters of Evers’ plan say that public schools are being hurt by the movement of funds from public schools to the voucher schools and as a result, public education suffers from a funding deficiency.

Read article from Wisconsin Public Radio

 

Surprising Supreme Court ruling says no to policing for profit

This is one of those legal issues that most people are not aware of, until it hits them in the face. In some states–in this case, Indiana–police can seize assets of someone convicted of a crime, even if the value of the seized assets are significantly greater than the crime’s nominal penalties. Or as this article points out, a crime takes place on your property without your knowledge and without your involvement and yet the state takes your home. If you are interested in criminal justice, you need to read this article from Slate.

Price tag on Evers’ plan to ensure residents have safe, clean drinking water may top $70 million

So what will it cost for Gov. Evers’s plan to ensure that residents of Wisconsin have safe drinking water? One estimate suggests the price tag will top $70 million and according to an article in The Wisconsin State Journal, Evers plans to borrow the funds. Borrowing would come from bonds issued by the state agriculture department and the Department of Natural Resources.

Read article from the State Journal.

Report looks at the financial challenges involved in providing Special Education services to pupils in Wisconsin

Funding for public education in Wisconsin is often confusing and complex. A 2019 report from the Wisconsin Policy Forum, “Special Education Funding in Wisconsin: How it Works and Why it Matters,” examines the way we fund special education services to pupils in the state. It is an eye-opener and if you are concerned about education in general and the challenges state taxpayers (and school districts) face in providing these services, this is a must read.

The Wisconsin Policy Forum was created on Jan. 1, 2018, by the merger of the Madison-based Wisconsin Taxpayers Alliance and the Milwaukee-based Public Policy Forum.

Download a PDF version of the report on special education.

Kaul asking Evers for funds to hire additional crime analysts

Attorney General Josh Kaul has asked Governor Tony Evers to include additional funding in Evers’ budget for more crime lab analysts. In his successful campaign for the post last November, Kaul attacked former Republican Attorney General and now Judge Brad Schimel for well-publicized delays in the processing of evidence from crime scenes.

Evers is currently working on his two-year budget, which the governor expects to unveil on Feb. 28.

Read full article from WTMJ News.

As expected, state’s senators split on confirmation vote for new attorney general


As expected, Wisconsin’s two U.S. Senators, Ron Johnson (R) and Tammy Baldwin (D), split their vote to confirm new Attorney General Willima Barr to succeed acting Attorney General Matt Whitaker. Barr, a former attorney general during the George H. W. Bush administration, was nominated to serve his second term in the office by President Trump. The vote to confirm was 54-45, with all Republican senators voting for Barr. Three Democrats broke rank and voted for Barr.

In opposing his nomination, Baldwin said, “I do not have the confidence I need that this nominee to be America’s top law enforcement official will provide the independence we must have at this critical time.” In a prepared statement, she added, “I am also troubled that Mr. Barr would not commit to making the Special Counsel’s report public because I believe the truth should be revealed to the American people when the investigation is concluded.”

Read full article from the Journal-Sentinel.

Article says a win by Judge Neubauer in the April 2 election for the state Supreme Court may set stage for a revamping of the decidedly conservative court

A recent Associated Press article headlines: “Liberals eye 2020 takeover of Wisconsin Supreme Court.”  The article continues: “Wisconsin liberals hope to take a key step this spring toward breaking a long conservative stranglehold on the state’s Supreme Court, in an election that could also serve as a barometer of the political mood in a key presidential swing state.

If the liberal-backed candidate wins the April 2 state Supreme Court race, liberals would be in prime position to take over the court when the next seat comes up in 2020 — during a presidential primary when Democrats expect to benefit from strong turnout.”

Read the full article

State Sen. Olsen introducing two new education bills; co-sponsorships being sought

State Senator Luther Olsen, right, with Representative Joan Ballweg, left.

In his weekly newsletter to constituents, dated Feb. 8, State Sen. Luther Olsen reports the following:

“I am introducing two new pieces of legislation along with Representatives Mark Born and John Jagler regarding school operations and pupil data.

The first bill would allow a school administrator to warn a student before a fire, tornado or school safety drill, if it is in the best interest of the student. Under current law, these drills must be conducted without prior warning, but school administrators have highlighted that a warning would be helpful for students with disabilities, for example.

The second bill adds parents and guardians’ names to the statutory list of directory data. Under current law, information contained within a pupil’s record is confidential. School boards are permitted to disclose what is known as “directory data” without first getting permission from parents or guardians. The state law defines what is considered directory data. This includes a pupil’s name, address, phone number, date and place of birth, major field of study, participation in officially recognized activities and sports, weight and height of members of athletic teams, dates of attendance, photographs, degrees and awards received and the name of the school most recently previously attended by the pupil.

Schools are not required to include all of these items in their directory data list, but they cannot add any items that are not specified by law.

Missing from that list, under current law, are the names of the pupil’s parents or guardians. For safety reasons, there are scenarios where law enforcement or child welfare agencies might need to access that information. While there are limited circumstances under current law in which law enforcement and child welfare agencies can access additional information beyond what is considered directory data, by adding parent and guardian names to the directory data list, they will be able to access the information in a more timely manner.

We are currently circulating both bills for co-sponsorship and hope to introduce them shortly.”

GOP pleased with Hagedorn’s fundraising effort during last half of 2018


Members of Wisconsin’s Republican Party appear pleased with the amount of money raised over the last half of 2018 by conservative Wisconsin Supreme Court candidate Brian Hagedorn. Hagedorn is running against Judge Lisa Neuibauer in the April 2 election for a seat on the court being vacated by retiring Judge Shirley Abrahamson.

According to their figures, Hagedorn raised over $310,000 in the last half of the year. According to a post on the wisgop.org website, “The announcement is a sign of a strong campaign with a message that is resonating across Wisconsin. This end-of-year haul has surpassed the top fundraising totals of nearly all recent Supreme Court candidates in the last six months of a year leading up to an April election.”

According to another report, Hagedorn’s total is “almost three times as much as Screnock and almost $100,000 more than Justice Rebecca Dallet raised at this point in the campaign.” 

“At stake is more than just one Supreme Court seat. If conservatives fail to win this seat, the Democrats will just be one Spring election in 2020, held at the same time as their presidential primary, from being able to accomplish all of their Progressive dreams by judicial fiat. If the Democrats gain control of the Court, they can rewrite the legislative district lines just like they have in other states. They can override the legislature and mandate school spending levels – which will mean even higher taxes. They can undo all of the reforms of the Walker era without ever having to go through the legislature.

Instead of focusing on the presidential election, everything that matters in Wisconsin is on the line right now.”

For more on how Republicans and conservatives view what is happening in Wisconsin, visit Right Wisconsin.

Visit our We’re Watching Judge Lisa Neubauer page for the latest on her campaign.

Thanks to Penny Howell for alerting us to this item.